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Shawls and Bobbin Lace Abound

The good news is that I finally obtained a full time role!  I start my new position in a week and am looking forward to getting back into the workforce.  On the fiber end this will be good for me so that I stop creating Works In Progress (WIP).  My time off has seen me cast on several shawls – two of which are gossamer web based.  The Sunflower shawl is nearly done as I just have a 1/4 left of the edging to complete.  It still looks so much smaller than the photo but my hopes are that it grows with blocking.

I have begun and ripped out and restarted my gossamer triangular shawl and seem to be progressing much better now that I am past the first 4 rows of the border.  I still think there is an error in the pattern as I had to reduce some stitches to make things balanced but there is nothing online about this issue so perhaps it is just me.

IMG_4030[1]Bobbin lace is still awesome and I am working on my first true lace edging which will be attached to a handkerchief when it is done.  There is a great deal of pleasure of moving the bobbins around and pining threads to create intricate lace work.  I have had thoughts about learning needle lace but for now I am concentrating on learning Torchon lace work.  After all there are several styles of bobbin lace still yet to learn and master.  My homemade pillow is by far my favorite lace pillow but we shall see how things change when the sectional pillow arrives. I actually made this piece with silk yarn I purchased during the YarnFest in Loveland, CO in April.  I am amazed that the silk fibers stayed in place when the pins were removed.

IMG_3990[1]On the festival front it looks like I will only be participating in the Golden Farmer’s Market in July and August.  My heart is not into going to Salida this year so I decided to skip the festival and hopefully join it next year.  The only other market I am looking into is the Denver Public Library’s Paris Holiday Market in November.  Of course I will also have the Rocky Mountain Weaver’s Guild Sale in November to hopefully move my hand spun yarns into new homes.

I realized that I have not done much yarn spinning as my stash is so large.  I am finding it difficult to procure a local venue to sell the hand spun so I have begun listing the yarns on the Etsy site.  Once several of the 50+ skeins of yarn are sold I am sure the urge to boost my supply will occur.  For now I have some merino/tencel fiber being spun on my Russian spindle to be used in making a gossamer web shawl – 8 ounces of fiber should be enough to make this work.  Of course I also have flax fibers to play with and ply with different fibers (silk and cotton).  Having a huge stash of hand spun has allowed me to focus on knitting items and of course create lace with bobbins.

IMG_3989[1]I just have this nagging feeling that I am going to forget what my WIPs are at some point as in general I never had more than 3 at a time.  I don’t even want to contemplate how many actual WIPs there are but I breath a bit easier knowing that a few are almost complete.  As I get bored easily edgings are generally my downfall as they are so repetitive but the Sunflower shawl edge got a lot focus while at the hair salon and under the dryer this weekend.  My cotton spinning class was cancelled as we didn’t have enough people sign up for it but hopefully the silk and drop spindle courses will happen this summer/fall.

Well I am going to get back to knitting the gossamer web shawl for a bit and until next time – keep your needles sharp and yarn in abundance!

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2015 The Year of the Knitted Lace Shawl

So far I have 3 different lace shawls on needles while being almost done with one of them.  I’m very pleased to have finished knitting and blocking 2 lace shawls in 2014 for the fiber festival season.  My new blocking boards are wonderful.  One of the lace shawls is a “Shetland Lace Shawl” made with Habu yarn and is my long term (1+ year project).  The other 2 are from the great book “New Vintage Lace” although I strongly recommend researching the erratas before beginning a project.

Since I have 2 finished shawls I am happily pursuing the art of Bobbin Lace making.  My first local guild meeting was very inspiring and encouraging.  I foresee making trims for pillows and long term project of a table runner.  Maltese Lace is my goal as it is elegant and intricate.  For the moment of course I’m just learning the techniques while making bookmarks – we all need to start at the beginning and with small projects.  Enjoy the photos of my journey – till next time!

Blue Lace Shawl - Alpaca

Blue Lace Shawl – Alpaca

Shetland Lace Shawl

Shetland Lace Shawl

Bobbin Lace Bookmark

Bobbin Lace Bookmark

Newest lace shawl

Newest lace shawl

2014 Markets and Festivals

This year I decided if I really wanted to grow my business locally I needed to participate in more markets and festivals.  I now find myself with booked Saturdays from July thru most of September and a couple of dates in October – wow!  My first 2 events have been at the Golden Farmer’s Market which have been a bit slow.  I have had at least 1 sale each event and am grateful I don’t have a booth fee.  The big market is this Saturday the 12th which is the HorseShoe Market.  This event is more of a craft event with lots of vintage sellers and small business owners along with great food trucks.  It was a big investment for me and I’m hopeful that I will not only make my booth fee back in sales but also a profit this year.

The great thing about the markets is setting up the booth and laying out my merchandise.  My first market in Golden helped me realize how little knitted items I had and how few hand spun yarns were for sale.  As I am going for more of a fiber supplier business model I knew that I had to create many more skeins of yarn if I want to make this a viable business model.  Fleeces and rovings are in abundance in my inventory but most of these will truly sale at the Salida Fiber Festival versus the farmer’s markets.  So with some clear goals and set time for production my yarn inventory is increasing.  This year new display tools were purchased and I’m still working out the best way to use each to highlight my merchandise.  My lace shawl gets so many compliments and draws in quite a few people – I know one of these days it will find its’ way into a good home.

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One of the best features of the market is the networking opportunities that come while I’m spinning yarn.  Thus far I have made contacts to obtain new fibers at minimal financial cost and an opportunity to teach seniors how to spin yarn.  I always bring my wheel to the markets as it is a great conversation piece and allows me to get in some production time.  Men and boys are always drawn to the mechanics of the wheel and ask lots of questions which over time I have developed answers for.  

Teaching a spinning class

This past Saturday I taught my first drop spindle class of 2014.  I taught this method twice last year and then somehow let teaching get away from me.  The class was held at the Recycled Lamb in Golden, Colorado and I had a total of 5 students.  We spent 2 hours learning how to draft fibers, thigh spin, spin on a drop spindle and then review fiber tools.  The next class will be 3 hours so that my students spin a decent amount of a single ply yarn and then we can 2 ply it so they have a small skein to show for their class period.  As with any process the more you engage in it the better one can tweak areas to make the process better.  Even though I was a bit nervous about teaching others once we started talking about fiber I found my groove.

Things are a bit slow on the production front from last week for several reasons.  Primarily I received a record number of 7 sales last week which required packaging and shipping.  Also I had to prep for the spinning class and get goody bags together for my students.  The second set of goody bags was packaged for the Horseshoe Market in July and given my schedule I am just going to mail the items to the event versus attempting to drop them off this week.  The college kid will be assisting in labeling packages which should help me get the 50 bags out the door sooner.  I did manage to finish knitting one summer hat and spin a single ply of some merino/silk last week plus there are the 2 skeins finished earlier last week.

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I still have knitting and spinning projects in the works this week and will have pictures for you a bit later.

Works in Progress

Last week I made a commitment to be more productive with my hand spinning of yarns and knitting of items which was based on my small supply of material to sell.  I am happy to say that my production schedule is working and I completed 2 skeins of yarn and 1 hat within a week’s time frame.  These 2 lovely skeins were spun into 2 ply yarns that still need to be measured but I’m thinking they are DK to Worsted weight yarns.  The cabled lace hat also has been finished and was a challenge because I don’t particularly like cable needles.IMG_3474[1]               IMG_3475[1]

I love the shine factor in both of these yarns and am having fun going through my stash of dyed rovings.  There was a time towards the end of 2013 that I found myself short on dyed fibers but somehow that has been remedied (shopping sprees).  This week I am on target for 4 skeins of yarn as I plied 2 yarns on Sunday and they are drying this week.  The dyed Louet Fiber yarns are on the menu for this week.  These rovings will have to be Navajo plied to keep the colors from being muddy which requires spinning a fine single so I may just do one of them.  I’m really trying to boost the number of worsted and DK weight yarns in the inventory so I plan on spinning more of my other rovings than the Louet group.

On the needles is a new hat being made from the yarn I won at the Salida Fiber Festival last year.  I won 3 skeins of a linen/cotton based yarn in pretty spring colors (green, yellow and peach).  The yarns are being turned into hats with a broken rib stitch pattern but using a 2×2 ribbing.  I had started to make a cowl using some kettle dyed yarn I received as a gift but am not liking the look of it with the color changes.  This yarn has short color changes and knitting it in the round is creating a very muddled mess of colors.  Thinking this yarn will make a better scarf than cowl and as it is a cotton/cashmere blend it deserves to be in a special project.  My inventory only has 3 cowls in it and most are very warm so the search is on for the right lightweight yarn in a good color scheme to make cowls for the summer.

2014 projects – stops/starts thus far

This year has brought so many challenges and activities.  Last month I had the privilege of learning bobbin lacemaking from an established bobbin lace maker.  I confess that the project  which is just a band of lace is still on the pillow as it requires me to move my work up and take out all of the pins to do so.  I am equating this process to be similar to “steeking” in knitting.

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The first farmer’s market has passed and I have learned that my handmade items for sale are very low.  There are only 6 hand spun skeins in inventory at this point along with 3 hats (fall weight) and 2 cowls.  How did I sell so much of my products?  Of course I still have several mohair/silk ruffle scarves and the lace shawl/stole.

The market was a wake up call to me as I have been working on several long term knitting and spinning projects along with learning bobbin lace making.  On the positive I have started recording my knit projects in a journal to keep track of them and the yarn used.  It also helps in writing the blog.  Since it takes me about 2 hours to spin 4oz of roving for sports/worsted yarn, I am dedicating at least 3 nights a week to spinning.  As I now know what my handmade inventory is lacking I have 2 summer hat projects on needles.

These photos highlight the new yarns  Merino Wool/SilkTencel/Merino  I have my work cut out for me but I am much more productive when I have a goal!

2014 The Year of Tatting

I finally took the plunge in January and taught myself how to needle tatting.  I love this medium and it made much more sense to me than shuttle tatting.  Yes shuttle tatting is the traditional method of tatting but I’m glad to have had people encourage me to try needle tatting.  I knitted a beautiful doily in 10/2 cotton yarn but didn’t like the crocheted edging the pattern called for.  When I took up tatting I realized that I could make a lacy border for the doily which suited my tastes much better than the crocheted one.

Knitted doily

Tatted border
Tatted border

 

This year I have also been knitting several intricate lace items – I’m up to 3 projects on my needle.  The doily is the first and will be finished as soon as the border is done.  My next project is lace fingerless mittens showcased in Knitting Traditions Lace magazine and is being made on size 00 needles with wool/silk yarn.  The third project is a knitted beaded shawl made with lace alpaca yarn and is also a project from the same magazine.  I’m so glad I purchased this issue of the magazine as there are so many projects I can envision making over the course of the year.

Knitting Traditions Lace Fingerless Mittens

Knitting Traditions Lace Fingerless Mittens

beginning of mitten

beginning of mitten

 

Of course I am still spinning and have had to remind myself to do so at least twice a week to keep my mental balance.  I won 2 fleeces at this year’s National Western Stock Show auction.  One is a white Romney fleece with 6″ to 8″ locks and the other is a white Wensleydale fleece with 6″ to 8″ locks.  The Romney has been scoured and is just beautiful.  The locks are being spun on my new Ashford Traveler wheel.  The Louet wheel has some dyed Merino roving being spun on it in a fingering weight yarn.  Both of these fleeces came from a ranch in Oregon.

spun Romney

spun Romney

Romney fleece raw

Cleaned Romney locks
Cleaned Romney locks